Art Collection: C.F. Goldie

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Titel: A Good Joke
Artist: Charles Frederick Goldie
Seize: 40 x 50 cm
Type: Chromolitograph
Piece no. 202067

$5,500.00

C.F. Goldie: The Old Master  

                                                                             

A must have for any New Zealand interior, Goldie is famous for his extraordinarily realistic portraits of elderly Māori.

 

We are very excited to have an original cromolithograph produced in the early part of the twentieth century by Goldie, titled "A Good Joke" in our collection as well as an original Goldie oil painting dated 1917 titled "Lost in Thought, an Arawa Chieftain."  

About 'A good joke' 

Chromolithography is a unique method for making multi-colour prints and was first developed in the 19th Century. This particular chromolithograph was from an original oil painting held in the Dunedin Public Art Gallery.

Possibly the most well-known Māori portrait by Goldie, this painting was originally titled "All 'e Same t'e Pakeha". It is a portrait of a laughing Te Aho-te-Rangi Wharepu of the Ngati Mahuta tribe of Waikato, New Zealand, wearing a bowler hat, greenstone earrings, a brown jacket and grey waistcoat with a piece of coral in gold attached to a chain across his waistcoat.

About the artist

In a career spanning five decades, Goldie earned an international reputation through his portraits of Māori. He was represented and acclaimed at the Royal Academy of Arts in London and the Societe des Artistes Francais in Paris. Since the start of his career at the beginning of last century, Goldie has been championed in one decade and derided in the next. Yet his appeal to the public, especially Māori, has never wavered.

 

Now, art professionals and the public are in agreement: the portraits of Charles Goldie have become, once again, vitally significant to New Zealand art.

Goldie travelled extensively throughout Europe: to Antwerp, Rome, Florence, Venice, Milan, Naples, Amsterdam, the Hague, Rotterdam and most of the famous galleries, copying first hand many of the works of the Old Masters.

 

He was especially influenced by Rembrandt, as evidenced by the distribution of deep shadows and soft light on rich complexions that became a hallmark of his Māori portraits.

Born in Auckland, son of David Goldie, timber merchant. Educated at Auckland Grammar School where the art master was J. G. Trevithick and by 1885 had begun to win certificates and prizes at exhibitions at the Auckland Society of Arts and the New Zealand Art Students Association.

 

Studied art with L. J. Steele, also said to have taken lessons from artist Robert Atkinson. Went to Paris c.1892 and studied at Julian Academy under Bouguereau, Constant, Ferrier and Baschet: seems also to have studied portraiture in London from Sir James Guthrie. He visited and copied art in many European galleries.

In 1898 he returned to New Zealand and for a time shared a studio with Steele, teaching with him (The French Academy of Art): in 1899 collaborated with Steele in painting The Arrival of the Maoris in New Zealand, based on Gericault's Raft of the Medusa. In 1901 Goldie paid his first visit to Rotorua, in 1901 Steele and Goldie were listed as partners in Wise's, but possibly by then the partnership was beginning to break up.

Goldie took private pupils and taught at the Ladies College, Remuera. In 1906-07 he paid more visits to Rotorua and possibly the Taupo area, taking photographs and making sketches of Māori subjects.

 

Although Goldie made his name painting portraits of Māori he did paint portraits of Europeans as well, and painted one large oil of a Biblical subject; this was not only to satisfy his father, a very religious man, but to satisfy the critics who by that time were suggesting that pictures with a story base were more worthy than the ordinary depiction of a human face. In the face of a lessening appreciation of his Māori subjects he set off in 1920 to return to France via Sydney but married in Sydney and stayed there painting copies of earlier Māori portraits.

 

With his health beginning to deteriorate, he is now thought to have been affected by lead poisoning. By January 1923 he was back in Auckland but unwell and doing little painting. At last in 1934, encouraged by Lord Bledisloe, the governor, he began painting seriously again and exhibited with the Royal Academy in 1934-48 and in the Paris Salon. His health again deteriorated and he died in Auckland in 1947.

sources: 

Goldie-202081 .jpg
 
Title: 

Te Mutu Haranui, Te Arawa Chief (Lost in Thought, an Arawa Chieftain)

Artist: Charles Frederick Goldie
Size: 30.5 x 25.5 cm
Type: Oil on canvas
*This painting was in a private collection in Melbourne Australia for many years before being purchased and returned to New Zealand in 2020. 
*More information is available on request including an independent evaluation, conservation report and research document. 
Piece no. 202081

P.O.A.

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Title: Portrait of Ina Papatahi of the Nga Puhi tribe.
Artist: Charles Frederick Goldie
Size: 33 x 40 cm
Type: Chromolithograph
Piece no. 202082

From:

$850.00

Charles Frederick Goldie, 1870-1947

 

“The memory of what has been and never will be.”  

 

Portrait of Ina Papatahi of the Nga Puhi tribe. Ina lived close to Goldie’s studio and was one of his favourite models. 

Chromolithograph, size 33.0cm x 40.0cm, plate signed C F Goldie lower right-hand side.

Chromolithography is a unique method for making multi-coloured prints and was first developed in the 19th Century. 

From an original Goldie painting dated 1905 and held in the Dunedin Art Gallery.   

Goldie Most precious piece.com.jpg
 
Title:  “A Noble Relic of a Noble Race.”
Artist: Charles Frederick Goldie
Size: 33 x 40 cm
Type: Chromolithograph
Piece no. 202083

From:

$1,500.00

Charles Frederick Goldie, 1870-1947

 

“A Noble Relic of a Noble Race.” Atama Paparangi, Chief of the Te Rarawa tribe, who lived in the Hokianga region and fought at Okaihau with the infamous Hone Heke.

 

He last visited Auckland in 1901 and died in 1917 at the age of about 100 years.

Chromolithograph, size 33.0cm x 40.0cm, plate signed C F Goldie upper left-hand side.

Chromolithography is a unique method for making multi-coloured prints and was first developed in the 19th Century.   

A gallery about our New Zealand gems 

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Goldie | A good Joke

Patara Te Tuhi of Ngati Mahuta was one of the earliest in a long line of rangatira (chiefs) to sit for Goldie in his Shortland Street studio. His portrait, An Old Warrior, with its formal pose and chiefly accoutrements, reflects the “straight” approach to portraiture Goldie favoured, but which detractors have labelled stilted and lacking in flair. | NZGeo.com

Goldie

A good joke

Goldie
C. F.  Goldie

Charles Frederick Goldie in his Auckland studio

In 1917 Goldie painted then exhibited this work in the Canterbury Society of Arts Annual Exhibition

About ' te Mutu Haranui, Te Arawa Chief ' (Lost in Thought, an Arawa Chieftain) | In 1917 Goldie painted then exhibited this work in the Canterbury Society of Arts Annual Exhibition in March of that year in Christchurch.

Wauchop Watercolour | Golden frame

In 1917 Goldie painted then exhibited this work in the Canterbury Society of Arts Annual Exhibition

About ' te Mutu Haranui, Te Arawa Chief ' (Lost in Thought, an Arawa Chieftain) | On the reverse of the painting are the details of the framemaker Goldie employed from Wellington, McGregor Wright, together with an exhibition label number 15.

Goldie | A Good Joke | Dark frame

Goldie | A good Joke

Moodboard

Goldie Lithographs

Removing old frames | Always a surprise

Christchurch Painter |

Wauchop

Goldie | Chromolitograph

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Christchurch, New Zealand

Tel: 021 969 554

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